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Little Hound Tor

There are 3 Hound Tors on Dartmoor. One is the impressive tor near Manaton - commonly associated with the Baskervilles. The other 2 are miles away in isolated moorland south of Cosdon. Little Hound Tor is not really a tor but a cairn that was built in 1834 on a low hill by an ambitious local who hoped that it would become one of the tors of the original Dartmoor forest boundary. He could then increase his grazing rights.  It is rather non descript but it gives the walker an excuse to approach the inner heartland of the northern moor. It's a pretty easy place to get to. From Little Hound Tor all sorts of walks become possible. Little Hound Tor is also known as Little Whit.
Park offroad (SX 659910) near Throwleigh and head up the Blackaton Gorge passing Shilley pool on the way. At the top of the gorge make for the 3 track stone row at the foot of Cosdon Hill. Take the old peat path that skirts Cosdon towards Hound Tor. Be aware of the boggy ground around Raybarrow pool and plot your course accordingly. Then head westwards to gain the track between Cosdon and Little Hound Tor. Once you are on the track then the rest is straightforward. Head down to the Tor and then - if time is limited - head back up north to Cosdon. From the top of Cosdon you can then easily descend down the eastern side to the Blackaton ford and then walk back to the road via the easy ground of Throwleigh Common.
A straightforward walk but the ground around Raybarrow is wet and boggy. You aren't in any military areas . Takes about 3 hours.
 
Off road parking at SX 659910 near to Moor Farm.
The wet ground of the track that leads up from the road to Shilley Pool.
Shilley Pool. This is one of a number of delightful places along the Blackaton Brook. This is popular with bathers in the summer - but in the winter it's quiet. Roger Deakin mentions it in his Waterlog book.
Clambering up the rocky gorge of the Blackaton brook. The ground is pretty wet as well.
The flat ground of Cheriton Combe above the Blackaton gorge with the characteristic whaleback of Cosdon on the skyline. The ground gets pretty wet and boggy around here.
An impressive triple stone row (known as The Graveyard) that runs W- E on Cheriton Combe plain at SX 644915. This shows the western part. The eastern part of the row has suffered from stone robbing.
A picture of the old sunken peat track that skirts around Cosdon Hill. It is sometimes known as the South Zeal track since peat was brought down to the village from the upper Taw moor.
Beside the peat track at SX 639905. This is where the track becomes more indistinct as it snakes westward around the boundary of Raybarrow pool.
This is the edge of the infamous Raybarrow pool. There are few really dangerous bogs on Dartmoor but this is one to be careful of.
The wet ground just east of the trackway. SX 635905.
The trackway that lies between Cosdon and Little Hound Tor.
The rough track that heads down to Little Hound Tor.
The cairn at Little Hound Tor - or Little Whit Hill. Steeperton is in the distance.
Another view of Little Hound Tor. The view from here includes Hound Tor, Wild Tor and Hangingstone Hill.
The track leading up to Cosdon.
Approaching the main cairn of Cosdon. Cosdon is the largest hill of NE Dartmoor and can be seen from many miles around. There are 3 cairns grouped together on the top. Cosdon has been used as a signal beacon for centuries. It figured in the times of the Armada but has also been used recently for more symbolic purposes.
One of the cairns on Cosdon Hill with the OS triangulation point (SX 637915).
Sheep on top of Cosdon.
View over Cheriton Combe from halfway up the eastern side of Cosdon. The watery parts on the left are remains of old tin workings.
Cosdon from the edge of Throwleigh Common.
The track that runs along Throwleigh Common at SX 650908. This is much easier walking than clambering up the Blackaton Gorge.
 


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